Kondor Art Square : Plastic People and Dead Cities

This month, the Kondor Art Square features two exhibitions by artists Traci Ultsch and Monique “Moni” Beebe along with a completely new display at the Kondor Art Collection.

Traci and Moni are two artists whose works are very different from each other, but the magic that happens when they come together is something everyone experienced in their last exhibition – Crash – at the Midgaard Gallery. For many art lovers, Crash has been one of their favorite exhibits.

They have returned once again in a joint exhibition, this time at the Kondor Art Square. Although I refer to it as a “joint exhibition“, Traci and Moni actually display two separate exhibitions of their own in the square, each in their own characteristic style.

Plastic People by Monique Beebe – Kondor Art Square

On one side of the square, Moni presents “Plastic People“, which is essentially a character study of people in Second Life. Moni refers to the virtual life as a plastic one, which people can mold into any form they wish to. Some prefer to dance, explore and enjoy the life, others strive to start their own business. Some develop building skills or learn to create mesh, while others like photography, film making etc.

Each of us has our own thing we want to do in Second Life. It isn’t a question of what is good or bad, just a question of what we wish to be. Moni’s works centered around the plastic people of the virtual world are highly relatable for those who have been around for a while; they are not just portraits of people but perhaps a depiction of the virtual world as a whole.

Dead Cities by Traci – Kondor Art Square

On the other side, Traci displays “Dead Cities“. Those of you familiar with Traci’s work might realize that this series is very different from works she has presented in the past. For one, all of her works in this exhibit are in black and white, devoid of any color.

Traci explored the builds of various towns and cities in Second Life, attempting to capture “life” through street photography; but the more she wandered, she realized that these cities were in fact not alive, but rather dead. The works she presents here are layered and nuanced, giving us a hard look at the inevitable collapse of the structure of SL itself.

Traci puts up her art on scaffoldings, with a pile of bones placed behind each piece. If the myths and legends surrounding the founding architects of modern London are true, it is said they believed that constructing something needed a spiritual sacrifice on the foundations. The bones are symbolic of these gruesome sacrifices that were made to construct cities. Through “Dead Cities“, Traci shows us how eventually the layers decay, revealing all the sacrifices underneath.

The Kondor Art Collection – Kondor Art Square

The Kondor Art Collection, which is a permanent part of the square, has been revamped once again and this month, displays a completely new collection of works from some of the finest artists on the grid.

Although both exhibits in the art square, are different in all respects, they both have a common thread connecting them. They both make strong statements about Second Life and the virtual world in general, tackling different aspects of it. Plastic People focuses more upon the individual people that give this world meaning while Dead Cities talks about the structure of the world as a whole.

Traci stays consistent with her theme of “Pay as you feel” which she introduced in her last exhibit – “Overdose”, while Monique Beebe offers any of her works at just a token amount of L$1. This is a really great chance for you to collect artwork for your collection from these great artists who create their art, not for money or reward, but because they enjoy it.

Click HERE to visit the Kondor Art Square and enjoy the art of Traci and Moni.