Blue Orange Project : Part One

Every year, a group of artists together create something truly incredible. Enter the Blue Orange Project!

Curated and designed by Ini (in.inaka), this year is the fifth edition of the Blue Orange Project. It opened on January 24th, 2021 with an interesting new theme for this year – Expressionism, Dada Art Movement, Surrealism and Modern Avant-Garde. In one way or another, all the art you find in this project will be linked to one of the above art movements.

The landing point is at a train station. The Blue Orange Project is like a small maze with galleries and installations found all around, so there is no recommended path as such to follow. But look towards your right and you will see a small door with a board saying “Art Corner” above it. This is the one I entered through. As soon as you enter, the first exhibit is immediately to your left.

For most of your journey, I would advice you to keep Shadows Off and Advanced Lighting On as it can get pretty dark in some areas if shadows are activated. However, some exhibits have specific instructions. So please follow them to get the best experience from the Blue Orange Project.

Xirana Oximoxi – “Children in War

When a war breaks out, it has an effect on the lives of all people living in the affected areas in some way or another. But the ones it affects the most are children who are deprived of their innocence due to it. They are forced to endure hardships and encounter brutality, thus witnessing first-hand the darker side of humankind in a way that most of us never do in our own lives. This leaves a permanent scar on their mind. We often see the faces of these kids on television briefly in media reports; however in that fleeting moment, they are able to create a lasting impression on our mind.

In this series of images known as “Children in War“, artist Xirana Oximoxi tries to capture the effect of war and conflict on the faces of these innocent victims whose worlds have been destroyed.

Gitu Aura – “Visa to your dreams

Art speaks where words are unable to explain” – a quote that especially rings true as you stare down a long hallway whose walls are adorned with Gitu’s art. The way she uses different shades of the same color in her paintings is truly incredible. The titular painting in this exhibition – “Visa to your dreams” – is created on the backdrop of what are perhaps newspaper cutouts and uses various shades of brown and

Another painting depicting the feet of a running man uses maps from the Lord of the Rings trilogy as a backdrop to the main image. Each of Gitu’s vibrant works tends to connect with some place in your heart and stir your emotions. It is truly difficult to choose your favorite in this fascinating collection!

Stabitha – Hallway

Right after the entrance to Xirana’s exhibit, another doorway leads into a long hallway lined on both sides by windows of different sizes. This rather artistic hallway, created by Stabitha (what88.zond), will take you to the next room. The journey is short but pleasant and sets the tone perfectly for the next exhibit.

It is this kind of attention given to every small detail that sets the Blue Orange Project apart and gives it a class of its own.

Mistero Hifeng & Tallulah Winterwolf

The next room contains artworks by Tallulah Winterwolf on its walls while the center is taken up by Mistero Hifeng’s signature surrealist sculptures. The works of the two artists complement each other perfectly and belong together.

Tallulah’s work takes inspiration from the works of an eccentric unknown amateur photographer from the 50s and 60s in New York – Vivienne Maier. She took most of her photographs secretly, mainly depicting the lives of people who remained confined to their own social bubbles. Each of her works tells us a story that can be interpreted in many different ways, depending upon the viewer.

Note : While in this room, please set Environment to Midnight and set your Graphics halfway to Ultra for the best viewing experience.

After viewing the exhibits in this room, pass through the moving curtain at the far end of the room to enter a fascinating installation by Venus Adored.

Venus Adored – Escher Cube

Venus is an artist who is famous for her work using particles. However, once in a while, she creates an installation that just takes our breath away. For the Blue Orange project, Venus presents the Escher Cube, the fourth in her series of cubes inspired by the work of masters in art.

Each of these cubes is dedicated to a famous painter or artist. After making cubes on Van Gogh, Dali and Monet, Venus decided to make one dedicated to the art of Maurits Cornelis Escher – a Dutch graphic artist who made mathematically inspired woodcuts, lithographs, and mezzotints. What makes this cube even more special is the fact that this only contains the black and white works of Escher.

The Blue Orange Project is an enormous place filled with art and to cover it in sufficient detail while giving proper justice to the artworks it holds, I will be exploring the rest of the project in a separate article soon. Stay tuned for Part Two of the Blue Orange Project.

But why wait?

Click HERE to visit the Blue Orange Project inworld and explore the incredible art for yourself!